Summer 2016

SUMMER SESSION 2016

 

Department of English
Hill Hall, Room 503
Phone:  973/353-5279
Fax:      973/353-1450
http://english-newark.rutgers.edu

SEE ALSO: ENGLISH, AMERICAN LITERATURE & ENGLISH, COMPOSITION & WRITING

FICTION INTO FILM (3 cr.)
21:350:205:B2:01196
DAY: 5/26-7/2
MTWTh 10:15-12:00
CATALANO            CONKLIN 446

The responses of the English language and its literary conventions to the special demands of film.

COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS (3 cr.)
21:350:230:B6:03893
EVE: 5/26-7/2
MW 6:00-9:45

VAN CALBERGH        ENGELHARD 203

MEETS NEWARK CAMPUS CORE CURRICULUM HISTORY & LITERATURE REQUIREMENT (LITERATURE PORTION)

The course provides a working knowledge and critical framework for looking at examples from this popular and evolving medium. Students will find themselves forging new ground in becoming comfortable and competent readers in a field where few critical traditions have been established. Students will be encouraged to reframe cultural issues of gender, race, sexuality, war, and nationalism as problems of representation: How do we tell stories and to what ends?

SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 cr.)
21:350:321:B6:03335
EVE: 5/26-7/2
MW 6:00-9:45
GERMEK                      CONKLIN 351

Literature of the British Isles, from its beginnings to the present.

TOPICS IN LITERATURE: HORROR FICTION (3 cr.)
21:350:337:T4:01407
DAY: 5/26-8/12
SATURDAY 8:30-12:45
ROSETTI                 CONKLIN 445

Too often, horror literature is ignored by the academic world. Yet for centuries, greatly talented writers have penned horror stories deserving of admiration and study. Horror literature is much more than a slippery shadow or a haunting scream. Horror writers explore the human psyche, delving into areas such as sexual repression, race relations, human frailty, and the limits of our imagination. This course explore the origins of horror fiction, its evolution through the literary eras, and its impact upon modern society. Readings include a sampling from the authors who have defined the genre: Horace Walpole, Bram Stoker, Mary Shelley, John Polidori, Edgar Allan Poe, M.R. James, H.P. Lovecraft, Ambrose Bierce, Shirley Jackson, Daphne DuMaurier, Ray Bradbury, Joyce Carol Oates, Clive Barker, Dean Koontz, Poppy Z. Brite, and Stephen King…among many more.

BIBLE AS LITERATURE II (3 cr.)
21:350:344:H6:04792
EVE: 7/6-8/12

MW 6:00-9:30
ELIAS                     ENGELHARD 201

A study of the Bible, its literary variety, and historical and religious development in the New Testament.

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGLISH (3 cr.)
21:350:407:T1:01783
5/26-8/12

MEETING TIME BY ARRANGEMENT

By permission only.

Designed for students who wish to pursue literary studies (and who do not qualify for the Honors Program 21:350:495,496) outside the scope of existing courses. The student must interest a faculty member in supervising the project, convince him or her that the student has the ability to do the work, and then submit a written request to the department chair naming the consenting faculty supervisor. All other arrangements are determined by the student and supervisor.

INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH (1 cr.)
21:350:458:T1:01017
5/26-8/12

MEETING TIME BY ARRANGEMENT

By permission only.

Placement in an appropriate publishing, public relations, or media firm; a journal reflecting each working day’s activities plus a paper to be agreed upon by the academic supervisor and the intern.

INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH (3 cr.)
21:350:459:T1:02343
5/26-8/12

MEETING TIME BY ARRANGEMENT

By permission only.

Placement in an appropriate publishing, public relations, or media firm for 8 to 10 hours per week; a journal reflecting each working day’s activities plus a paper to be agreed upon by the academic supervisor and the intern.