Spring 2017

Shakespeare for the 21st Century
Professor Sohrawardy
21:350:206:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

In this course, students will theorize the relevance of Shakespearean resolutions (both enabling and limiting) for understanding issues and challenges of the 21st century (eg: fracking, conflicts in the Middle East, race relations in America, use and abuses of social media.)  We will cover representative comedies, tragedies, histories, romances, and sonnets. 
Though the reading list isn’t finalized, Titus Andronicus, Richard II, Othello, and The Tempest are all likely to be covered.) Students will be tested on their literacy and comprehension of plays and poems through bi-weekly quizzes. They will be expected to submit a mid-term (6-7 pages) and a longer, final paper (8-10 pages.) Because this course fulfills the GenEd requirement, its intended outcome is to prepare students to become productive members of society; and global citizens who can meet the challenging complexities of their own time by turning (and returning) throughout their lives to the lessons imparted in Shakespeare’s works. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Shakespeare for the 21st Century
Professor Baker
21:350:206:02       T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

In this course, students will theorize the relevance of Shakespearean resolutions (both enabling and limiting) for understanding issues and challenges of the 21st century (eg: fracking, conflicts in the Middle East, race relations in America, use and abuses of social media.)   This course satisfies the core requirement.

Children Literature
Instructor: Tidmarsh
21:350:211:01      T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Not a survey, this course attempts to cover some of the high points of literature for children in the west for the past two centuries, moving chronologically from the Grimms’ fairy tales to the present, and generically from folk and fairy tales through more literary fairy tales (Andersen) to the golden age of Victorian and Edwardian children’s literature to the 20th century fables, fantasy, poetry, and more. Students will do some field work in bookstores or classrooms or with publishers. The nature of this subject makes it appropriate for students of education, psychology, anthropology, social work, and many other fields in addition to English. We’ll have several guest lecturers. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Literary Masterpieces
Instructor: Munson
21:350:215:01       W/F 11:30-12:50 pm

Is. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Sp Tpcs Non Majors: Reading Travel Literature
Professor Akhimie
21:350:227:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

In this course, . This course satisfies the core requirement.

Sp Tpcs Non Majors: Race, Gender and Aemrican Films
Professor Edmondson
21:350:227:02       M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

In this course, . This course satisfies the core requirement.

Comics & Graphic Novels
Instructor: VanCalbergh
21:350:230:01       T/F 1:00-2:20 pm

In Comics and Graphic Novels we will read and discuss recent contributions to the genre, developing a critical framework and vocabulary for defining, describing and discussing this popular but amorphous medium. This course satisfies the core requirement.

The Art of Satire
Instructor: Berland
21:350:231:01       T/TH 4:00-5:20 pm

In this course, . This course satisfies the core requirement.

The Gothic
Instructor: Tidmarsh
21:350:232:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

In this course, . This course satisfies the core requirement.

Whose English?
Professor Lynch
21:350:233:01       M/W 4:00-5:20 pm

In this course, . This course satisfies the core requirement.

 

 

Forces in Modern Literature
Professor Hoddeson
21:350:248:01       M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

 This course satisfies the core requirement.

Introduction to Creative Writing * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Syeed
21:350:301:Q1      M/W 10:00-11:20 am

Introduction to Creative Writing is a multi-genre course divided into three sections: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Experience with these forms will ground the student in techniques useful to communicating effectively in many fields, including law, medicine, business, science, technology, and criminal justice. Each unit is based on several reading assignments and one creative written assignment. Methods of presentation of creative work will alternate between class group work; reading aloud; submission to the instructor for written feedback; and discussion with a class partner. At the end of the course students will have a portfolio that may serve as the creative portion of the application to the Creative Writing Minor.

Introduction to Creative Writing * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Workoff
21:350:301:Q2     T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Introduction to Creative Writing is a multi-genre course divided into three sections: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Experience with these forms will ground the student in techniques useful to communicating effectively in many fields, including law, medicine, business, science, technology, and criminal justice. Each unit is based on several reading assignments and one creative written assignment. Methods of presentation of creative work will alternate between class group work; reading aloud; submission to the instructor for written feedback; and discussion with a class partner. At the end of the course students will have a portfolio that may serve as the creative portion of the application to the Creative Writing Minor.

Foundation of Literary Study * Writing Intensive *
Professor Akhimie
21:350:308:Q1      ON-LINE

Provides English majors with a firm foundation in the terms, concepts, and issues of literary analysis. Reading includes selections from the major genres (poetry, fiction, drama, nonfiction prose) together with a variety of critical and historical approaches. Projects introduce students to the goals and methods of literary research, including the use of computers, and provide practice in writing about literature.

Hybrid Forms: Creative Writing Poetry * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Reyes
21:350:309:Q1      W/F 11:30-12:50 am

Shakespeare
Instructor: Elias
21:350:319:01       Thurs. 6:00-9:00 pm

Students who take this class will gain new insight into the meanings of race in our current historical moment by learning about the beginnings of racialism in the early modern period, a period that saw the beginnings of English colonialism in the Americas, the establishment of regular long distance trade routes to the Near East and India, the earliest slave trading expeditions, and the emergence of scientific classification of species and races.  Through our readings Shakespeare’s drama and key texts drawn from the sciences, travel writing, cartography and natural history from the early modern period we will be able to examine the emergence of new, powerful and contradictory theories about the nature of difference between human beings, between sexes, between religious and ethnic groupings, between noble and common blood, and the shifting meanings assigned to bodily differences like skin color.  Readings will include Shakespeare's plays (such as Othello, The Merchant of Venice, and The Tempest) and texts that were new or significant in the same period (such as writings by Aristotle, Linnaeus, Bernier, Mandeville, Harriot, Boaistuau, and Ortelius). Only open to Honors College Students.

Shakespeare
Professor Sohrawardy
21:350:320:01      T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Survey of English Literature
Professor Heffernan
21:350:321:01       T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

Major works of English Literature through Paradise Lost.

Tpcs. in Literature: (War Stories
Professor Larson
21:350:337:01           Thurs. 2:30-5:20 pm

Tpcs. in Literature: Rhetoric of Humor
Professor Fitzpatrick
21:350:337:62            Tues. 6:00-9:00 pm

Modern British Poetry
Professor Hirschberg
21:350:342:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

Poetry from the 1920s to the present: Eliot, Auden, Spenser, Thomas, Hughes, Larkin, and others.

Special Topics in Film
Professor Miller
21:350:364:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

Dramati

Sentence by Sentence: Style in Fiction * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Price
21:350:386:Q1      W/F 11:30-12:50 pm

Women in Medieval Literature * Writing Intensive *
Professor Heffernan
21:350:390:Q1      T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

This course will examine writing by medieval women:  the enigmatic lays of Marie de France, the mystical visions of Julian Norwich, the autobiographical account of the travels of
Margery Kempe, the correspondence of Heloise (and Abelard), and the CITY OF LADIES by Christine De Pizan.  It will also consider representations of women in Chaucer and the
Pearl poet.

Honors Topics in Literature: Literature of South Asia
Professor Abbas
21:350:391:01      T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

Seminar in Med Lit * Writing Intensive *
Professor Heffernan
21:350:440:Q1      T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

course.

Seminar English Literature: Postcolonia Europe
Professor Abbas
21:350:457:01      T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

American Literature 352

Writers at Newark II * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Choudhury
21:352:208:Q1      M/TH 1:00-2:20 pm

The objectives of this course, based each semester on the books of the writers featured in the Writers At Newark Reading Series, are to diversify our understanding of contemporary American writing in fiction and poetry, and to explore the development of personal identity in the books of prominent writers who work to sculpt individualized voices within a framework of multiplicitous American identities. Students have the unique opportunity to attend readings by the visiting writers at monthly readings and Q&As. Completion of this course requires attendance at all 4 (Tuesday, 5 p.m.) readings. See www.ncas.rutgers.edu/mfa for Writers At Newark schedule and writer bios.

Literature of New Jersey
Professor Kiniry
21:352:209:01       M/W 10:00-11:20 am

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hoddesson
21:352:211:01            M/W 4:00-5:20 pm

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hirschberg
21:352:212:01            T/F 8:30-9:50 am

Enduring favorites in American literatures since World War II in different genres, including works by Anne Tyler, Jerzy Kosinski, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Raymond Carver, Christopher Durgang, Amy Tan, Sam Shepard, Paul Auster, Toni Morrison, Jessica Hagedorn, Frank McCourt, Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, and Flannery O’Connor. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hoddeson
21:352:212:02            M/W 10:00-11:20 am

Enduring favorites in American literatures since World War II in different genres, including works by Anne Tyler, Jerzy Kosinski, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Raymond Carver, Christopher Durgang, Amy Tan, Sam Shepard, Paul Auster, Toni Morrison, Jessica Hagedorn, Frank McCourt, Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, and Flannery O’Connor. This course satisfies the core requirement.

American Literature of the 19th Century
Professor Bland
21:352:214:01       T/TH 4:00-5:20 pm

This course examines some of the major developments in American literature of the nineteenth century in the decades following the Civil War—an era of rapid and sweeping social, economic, political, technological, and cultural changes, and an era during which the definitions of both “American” and “literature” have been hotly contested.  Our study of the major literary movements of this period—Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism, plus selected subgenres within these—will focus on two major issues: Why particular movements emerged in particular historical moments, and how those literary techniques and strategies both reflect and help to shape individual and collective experience in those periods.

Literature of Social Protest
Professor Foley
21:352:225:01       M/W 10:00-11:20 am

We will read works of social protest emerging from a number of key moments in U.S. history: pre-Civil War abolitionism, late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century industrializations; the Great Depression; the antiwar, antiracist, and feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s; and present-day movements against mass incarceration and neoliberalism.  Our readings will include both literary and background historical/political texts.

Literature of Social Protest
Professor Fitzpatrick
21:352:225:63       Thurs. 6:00-9:00 pm

Special Topics in American Literature: Literature of the American Revolution
Professor Kiniry
21:352:250:01       M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

Through the theme of political and personal antagonisms, we look at some classic and not-so-classic texts of the Revolution and its uneasy aftermath. Readings include the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," Joseph Martin's "Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier," Joseph Ellis's "Founding Brothers," J. F. Cooper's "The Spy," and "American Aurora" by Richard Rosenfeld. This course satisfies the core requirement.

American Drama
Professor Miller
21:352:333:01       T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

America Literature of 20th Century *Writing Intensive*
Professor Hirschberg
21:352:344:Q1      T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm                        

American Writing from 1950-present. Novels and stories, along with some plays, poems and one or two films.

African American Literature to 1900 *Writing Intensive*
Instructor Oliver
21:352:396:Q1      Saturday 9:00-12:15 pm

This writing intensive course examines African American prose -- fiction and non-fiction -- poetry and drama from the mid-20th century through early 21st century. Students will learn time frames, significant intellectual trends, cultural values and literary genres of African American literature of the period studied and understand how selected writers and their works embody significant characteristics of their literary/historical periods.

Seminar in 20th Century American Literature: Harlem Renaissance
Professor Jones
21:352:416:Q1       M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

This course e American.

Recent Trends in American Fiction
Professor Keene
21:352:420:01       M/TH 1:00-2:20 pm