Fall 2017

Literature and Medicine
Professor Hadas
21:350:210                  Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

In recent years, the interface between illness and literature has been the site of a flourishing movement various known as Medical Humanities or Narrative Medicine.  This course introduces students to a few of the many salient works of history, fiction, drama, poetry, and memoir which have addressed issues of illness.  The readings divide along both thematic and generic lines, stressing both the sick person's experience and the impact of illness on the larger community.  Two or more speakers who are active in Narrative Medicine will present guest lectures.  In addition to quizzes and a midterm, students will work throughout much of the semester on a personal medical memoir of from 15-30 pages. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Children Literature
Instructor: Pate1
21:350:211                  M/W 4:00-5:20 pm

Not a survey, this course attempts to cover some of the high points of literature for children in the west for the past two centuries, moving chronologically from the Grimms’ fairy tales to the present, and generically from folk and fairy tales through more literary fairy tales (Andersen) to the golden age of Victorian and Edwardian children’s literature to the 20th century fables, fantasy, poetry, and more. Students will do some field work in bookstores or classrooms or with publishers. The nature of this subject makes it appropriate for students of education, psychology, anthropology, social work, and many other fields in addition to English. We’ll have several guest lecturers. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Literary Masterpieces
Instructor: Berland
21:350:215                  W/F 11:30-12:50 pm

Introduction to great works of world literature; develops the ability to read with understanding and to enjoy literature that appeals to educated and mature readers. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Love Stories Old and New
Professor Heffernan
21:350:225                  T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

A consideration of love in literature from the fourteenth-century courtly romance to the twentieth-century American best-selling novel.  Readings will include a memoir by a fourteenth-century mystic, plays by Shakespeare, novels by Jane Austen and D. H. Lawrence as well as short stories by James Joyce. . This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Comics & Graphic Novels
Instructor Van Calbergh
21:350:230:90             By Arrangement (ON-LINE COURSE)

This course provides a working knowledge and critical framework for looking at examples from this popular and evolving medium. Students will find themselves forging new ground in becoming comfortable and competent readers in a field where few critical traditions have been established. Students will be encouraged to reframe cultural issues of gender, race, sexuality, war and nationalism as problems of representation: How do we tell stories and to what ends? This course satisfies the core requirement.

The Art of Satire
Instructor: Berland
21:350:231                  T/TH 4:00-5:20 pm

History, theory, and practice from Jonson to the present. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Forces in Modern Literature
Dr. Kahn
21:350:248:01             M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

In this course, we will look at controversial works of literature, film, and visual art, considering the relationship between art and society as well as art as a critique of culture. We will ask many questions in this course, including: How have race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality historically factored in critical reception? Why is art a continual site of cultural contestation? How do aesthetic controversies reflect fundamental beliefs that structure society?   This course satisfies the core requirement.

Forces in Modern Literature
Professor Chander
21:350:248:90             By Arrangement (ON-LINE COURSE)

Begin with Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Upton Sinclair " The Jungle,"  Henry James "The Turn of the Screw,"the play "Raisin In the Sun" (in fact & fiction); Allen Ginsberg & The Beats("Howl" etc)  More contemporary works, all politically, socially or morally controversial, will provide the remaining subject matter.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Forces in Modern Literature
Professor Chander
21:350:248:91             By Arrangement (ON-LINE COURSE)

Begin with Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Upton Sinclair " The Jungle,"  Henry James "The Turn of the Screw,"the play "Raisin In the Sun" (in fact & fiction); Allen Ginsberg & The Beats("Howl" etc)  More contemporary works, all politically, socially or morally controversial, will provide the remaining subject matter.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Forces in Modern Literature
Instructor: Tidmarsh
21:350:248:92             By Arrangement (ON-LINE COURSE)

TBA.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Green Lit: Reading & Writing the Earth * Writing Intensive *
Professor Larson
21:350:253:Q1            Thurs. 2:30-5:20 pm

“We’ve created a world that buffers us from nature,” says a world-renowned Canadian landscape photographer. What have we been missing, and why does it matter? 

In this interdisciplinary, discussion-based course, we will read and write about the Earth to get reacquainted with our common home. Five eye-opening films will show us incredibly beautiful, awesome, and toxic “manufactured” landscapes in the US and abroad. Students will also experience nature first-hand through an outdoors tour of our campus, an observation project, and field trips, including a boat adventure into the beautifully recovering Meadowlands.

Although “Green Lit” draws in many topics, students do not need to arrive with any special expertise. We’ll sample America’s best nature and environmentalist writers, including Native Americans, whose culture we’ll learn about at the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian in lower Manhattan. We will study the diverse American environmental movement; analyze poems, web sites, ads, food labeling, and super-marketing; weigh news stories and opinion about controversial issues, including environmental racism and climate change. In readings and films, students will discover college-age people like themselves who’ve invented alternative ways of living with the natural world.  This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Caribbean Literature
Professor  Edmondson
21:350:256                  M/W 10:00-11:20 am

Familiarizes the student with the basic themes and issues of Caribbean societies as represented in literature. The choice of texts reflects the linguistic and radical diversity of Caribbean cultures, as well as emphasizing the links among them. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Foundations of Literary Study *Writing Intensive*
Professor Sohrawardy
21:350:308                  T/H 10:00-11:20 am               

Provides English majors with a firm foundation in the terms, concepts, and issues of literary analysis. Reading includes selections from the major genres (poetry, fiction, drama, nonfiction prose) together with a variety of critical and historical approaches. Projects introduce students to the goals and methods of literary research, including the use of computers, and provide practice in writing about literature.

Shakespeare
Professor: Sohrawardy
21:350:319                  T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

A sampling of history, tragedy, comedy, and romance in plays representing the span of Shakespeare`s creative life.

Survey of English Literature
Instructor: Elias
21:350:321                  Thurs. 6:00-9:00 pm,  

An examination of major British prose and poetry from BEOWULF to Milton's PARADISE LOST.

Topics in Literature: LGBTQ: Writing Since Stonewall
Professor Keene
21:350:337                  M/TH 1:00-2:20 pm

This course will explore the development of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) literary production in the United States since the Stonewall Riots of 1969, widely acknowledged as the originary public, political and cultural moment for contemporary LGBTQ life. Using historical, theoretical, and archival materials, as well as specific works of poetry, fiction, drama, nonfiction, and films and video, the course will walk through selected stages of LGBTQ literary and cultural production, exploring the artistic, rhetorical and political uses of the erotic/sexual in LGBTQ literatures, with a focus on how LGBTQ identities have been represented in literary discourses over this period, and how these shape our understandings of what it means to be LGBTQ. One focus will be on the negotiation LGBTQ writers engage in vis-à-vis the heterosexual majority and particular queer readerships. At all times the course will attend to issues of gender, race and ethnicity, class, economics, politics and ideology, and other vital intersectional questions.

Special Topics in Film: Africa in Literature and Film
Professor Edmondson
21:350:363:01             Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

Why is Africa so ubiquitous in contemporary Western literature? This course will explore representations of Africa and Africans from both African and non-African (or Western) perspectives. Utilizing a variety of narratives, we will investigate why Africa remains a fraught symbol of racial, political and gendered relationships in Western discourses. Course material will include film, poetry, novels (both canonical and contemporary), and critical essays. Topics for discussion will include race and coloniality; depictions of African nationalism and its gender/sexual politics.

Special Topics in Film: Hitchcock
Professor Miller
21:350:363:02             T/H 10:00-11:20 am

In a career than spanned six decades and more than fifty films, Alfred Hitchcock was the dominant figure in the first century of cinema. His films set new standards for cinematic invention and storytelling style. He was both a visionary artist and a consummate entertainer...and became the most widely recognized director who ever lived.

The Short Story  * Writing Intensive *
Professor Hirschberg
21:350:381:Q1            T/TH 10:00-11:20 am            

Reading and critical study of classical, medieval, and modern short stories; discussion of predominant techniques and theories.

Honors Tpcs in Literature: Remapping the World
Professor Abbas
21:350:391                  T/H 2:30-3:500 pm

In this course, we will study how artists and writers use different visual  forms and literary genres to tell stories of colonialism and the modern world.   We will immerse ourselves in the work of three figures: Shahzia Sikander, Amitav Ghosh, and John Keene.

We will ask these, among other questions: How do the forms they use enable their stories and visions?  How do they challenge and transform the artistic and literary forms  (miniature painting, animations, novels, short stories) they use?  What is the capacity of art and literature to tell different histories of the world? Critical readings from Peter Sloterdijk, Faisal Devji, Homi Bhabha, among others.  Possible visits to Sikander's studio and to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Seminar English Literature: The Interdisciplinary 18th century * Writing Intensive *
Professor Lynch
21:350:457:Q1            Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

An experiment in setting literature in what we might call deep context. The "long 18th century" in Britain, from about 1660 to 1800, witnessed the beginnings of capitalism, calculus, modern chemistry, notions of the unconscious, a powerful middle class, and the American, French, and Industrial Revolutions. It's the first age to discuss human rights, women's rights, and animal rights. All of those contexts illuminate the literature of the period. In this class students will pursue their own interests in reading about the 18th century -- anatomy, crime, drugs, economics, feminism, homosexuality, Islam, literacy, music, painting, racism, sports, theater, war; almost any 21st-century topic has 18th-century resonance -- and most of the class readings will be created around these interests. We'll be exploring how an understanding of contexts can help us understand literary texts. This course satisfies the "pre-1800" and "pre-1900" requirements for the English major, and is writing-intensive.

English, American Literature

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hirschberg
21:352:211:01             TF 1:00-2:20 pm        

Enduring favorites in American literatures since World War II in different genres, including works by Anne Tyler, Jerzy Kosinski, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Raymond Carver, Christopher Durgang, Amy Tan, Sam Shepard, Paul Auster, Toni Morrison, Jessica Hagedorn, Frank McCourt, Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, and Flannery O’Connor. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Dr. Kahn
21:352:211:02            W 6:00-9:00 pm

This course will expose students to recent trends in contemporary American literature from approximately 1980 to the present. While the novels considered are very different, there are similar themes addressed by each author that we will examine in detail—especially those related to gender, race, violence, war, sexuality, trauma, guilt, and shame. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hirschberg
21:352:212:01             T/H 11:3-12:50 pm

In this interdisciplinary course we will explore readings, media and film viewings from three major perspectives: A) financial commentaries and analyses, composed both by observers of the finance culture and the financiers themselves; B) a cluster of psychological approaches ranging from the behavioral/ cognitive/ to the psychoanalytic and neuroscientific; C) cultural overviews. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Instructor: Hart
21:352:212:02             T/H 11:3-12:50 pm

“Fiction [is] useful as a reminder of the truths under the surface of what we argue about every day and a way of seeing and hearing the voices, the multitudes of this country.” — Barack Obama

This course emphasizes close reading and writing about contemporary American literature. It focuses on novels, short stories, graphic novels, and other media from the mid-1960s to recent times while aiming to provide students with a solid foundation for interpretation and literary analysis.. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Fitzpatrick
21:352:212:61             Tues. 6:00-9:00 pm

In this interdisciplinary course we will explore readings, media and film viewings from three major perspectives: A) financial commentaries and analyses, composed both by observers of the finance culture and the financiers themselves; B) a cluster of psychological approaches ranging from the behavioral/ cognitive/ to the psychoanalytic and neuroscientific; C) cultural overviews. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

American Literature
Professor Bland
21:352:213                  Wed. 8:30-9:50 Fri. 10:00-11;20 am

Nineteenth century American literature in the decades before the Civil War emerged from a broad variety of literary voices, each of which was seeking to address the qualities and characteristics particular to the experiences of being American.  This course will particularly concentrate on the historical contexts of American literature, its origins, the development of its canon, and the diversity of its writers and readers.  By examining topics including nature, race and slavery, the roles of women, and other broad, national ideas during this period, the course will focus on one major issue:  How did the United States establish its own voice and literary culture?

The readings in this course are drawn from the early decades of the nineteenth century through the Civil War.  This course satisfies a General Education requirement

Literature of Social Protest
Professor Foley
21:352:225:01             Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

We will read works of social protest emerging from a number of key moments in U.S. history: pre-Civil War abolitionism, late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century industrializations; the  Great Depression; the antiwar, antiracist, and feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s; and present-day movements against mass incarceration and neoliberalism.  Our readings will include both literary and background historical/political texts. This course satisfies a General Education requirement.

Literature of Social Protest
Professor Abbas
21:352:225:02             T/H 11:30-12:50 pm

TBA. This course satisfies a General Education requirement

Literature American Revolution
Professor Kiniry
21:352:250                  M/W 10:00-11:20 am

Through the theme of political and personal antagonisms, we look at some classic and not-so-classic texts of the Revolution and its uneasy aftermath. Readings include the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," Joseph Martin's "Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier," Joseph Ellis's "Founding Brothers," J. F. Cooper's "The Spy," and "American Aurora" by Richard Rosenfeld. This course satisfies a General Education requirement

Latino/a Literature and Culture * Writing Intensive *
Professor Lomas
21:352:324:Q1            M/W 4:00-5:20 pm

This class surveys representative texts of Latina/o Literature and Culture, from the colonial period to the present.  Contextualizing the post-1960s "classic" Chicana/o and Latina/o writing through a comparative and historical approach, this course introduces students to the rich history and vibrant contemporary culture of the largest “minority” group of the United States. Situated in the U.S. and characterized by an historical relationship to Latin America and to the Spanish language, Latino/a literature and culture includes diverse traditions of Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and newer migrant writers from South and Central America and the Caribbean.  We will examine representative texts from these traditions and issues related to (im)migration, assimilation and dislocation; working conditions, labor struggles and economic regionalization; modes of self-representation including translation, bilingualism and code-switching; the marketing and consumption of latinidad or "Latin-ness" in popular culture; cultural hybridity, mestizaje, and heterogeneity; and the role of gender, sexuality, immigration status, color, class, language and nationality in locating Latina/o subjectivities. Through reading and listening in a variety of genres--including fiction, poetry, journalism, oratory, performance art and music--we consider genres created or transformed by Latina/o writers.  Latina/o literature course will be focused on the 19th century and will thus fulfill the pre-1900 requirement.

Representative of Race
Professor Foley
21:352:348                  M/W 10:00-11:20 am 

We will read texts by Native American, Asian American, Latina/o, African American, and Euro-American writers.  We shall examine the range of ways in which “race” is constructed in literary texts, both through assumptions about “race” that readers are assumed to hold and assertions about “race” that are explicitly or implicitly set forth in the texts.  A probable (not yet definite) list of novels examined will include: Anne Petry's *The Street*; Maria Helena Viramontes's *Under the Feet of Jesus*; Leslie Marmon Silko's *Ceremony*; Edwidge Danticat's *The Farming of Bones*; Mike Gold's *Jews Without Money*; Steve Yarbrough's *The Oxygen Man*; and John Okada's *No-No Boy.

Sp. Topics American Literature: Politics and Prose: Literature in the Early Republic
Professor Kiniry
21:352:368                  Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

This course investigates the literature written in the contentious early years of the United States as a nation (1787-1812), a period in which American writers asserted their independence while nevertheless nodding anxiously towards England and English literature.  We will be looking at fiction, drama, poetry, and non-fiction, including journalism.  Writers include Joel Barlow, James Fenimore Cooper, Olaudah Equiano, Washington Irving, Thomas Jefferson, Susanna Rowson, Alexis de Tocqueville, and Royall Tyler.

Afro-American Literature to 1900 * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Oliver
21:352:395                  Sat. 9:00-11:55 am     

This is a writing intensive course that examines 20th Century African American prose? Fiction and non-fiction? Poetry and drama.  At the end of this course, students will know the time frames, significant intellectual trends, cultural values and literary genres of 20th century African American literature and understand how selected writers and their works embody significant characteristics of their literary/historical periods.

Afro-American Literature After 1900
Professor Bland
21:352:396                  W/F 11:30-12:50 pm  

This course is intended to offer students an opportunity to focus on African American literature as a particular, individual genre.  The course will explore the interplay of social, cultural, political, and historical influences specific to the African American literary tradition.  Class readings, writings, and discussions will seek to identify and explore themes and strategies employed by African American writers that, paradoxically perhaps, seem simultaneously to embrace and expand the boundaries of that tradition.  The class will explore large questions concerning the social and cultural roots of the aesthetic choices made by writers, the “hero,” of the African American novel, the writer’s relation to the text, and the influence of African American experiences on the composition and narrative intentions of the texts.

Recent Trends in Am Fiction * Writing Intensive *
Professor Bartkowski
21:352:420:Q1            M/TH 1:00-2:20 pm

In this course we will be reading texts from the late 20th century and the early 21st which address issues pertinent to our times as they are represented by writers whose fictions are not polemical yet who are keenly attuned to the fissures and faultlines in contemporary life.  These writers create narratives that raise our awareness through compelling stories that look to the past, the present and the future so we may learn to read the lives of others and ourselves.  We will be reading Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood (Canadian, yes), Mohsin Hamid, and Philip Roth, among others.

Creative Writing Minor:

Introduction to Creative Writing * Writing Intensive *
Instructor:  Syeed
21:350:301:Q1            M/W 10:00-11:20 am 

Introduction to Creative Writing is a multi-genre course divided into three sections: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Experience with these forms will ground the student in techniques useful to communicating effectively in many fields, including law, medicine, business, science, technology, and criminal justice. Each unit is based on several reading assignments and one creative written assignment. Methods of presentation of creative work will alternate between class group work; reading aloud; submission to the instructor for written feedback; and discussion with a class partner. At the end of the course students will have a portfolio that may serve as the creative portion of the application to the Creative Writing Minor.

Introduction to Creative Writing * Writing Intensive *
Instructor: Luan
21:350:301:Q2            T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Introduction to Creative Writing is a multi-genre course divided into three sections: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Experience with these forms will ground the student in techniques useful to communicating effectively in many fields, including law, medicine, business, science, technology, and criminal justice. Each unit is based on several reading assignments and one creative written assignment. Methods of presentation of creative work will alternate between class group work; reading aloud; submission to the instructor for written feedback; and discussion with a class partner. At the end of the course students will have a portfolio that may serve as the creative portion of the application to the Creative Writing Minor.

Poetry of the People *Writing Intensive*
Instructor: Reyes
21:200:312:Q1                        M/W 10:00-11:20 am             

This workshop course is a reading and writing intensive course, studying the work of Contemporary American Poets in the period 1970-2012.  In the post-Vietnam war era, heavily influenced by The New York School, the Black Arts movements—and reflecting the cultural shifts brought on by the civil rights movement, feminism and the gay/lesbian  rights movement— new generations of poets appeared with new styles, new politics, new perspectives.  Postmodern poetry, L*A*N*G*U*A*G*E poetry, and neo-formalism share the literary stage with the issues facing poets of the new millennium: changing gender norms and sexual freedoms, globalization and technology.  The Penguin Anthology will be the primary text for the readings and the inspiration for the writing assignments.  Other textbooks for the course are Mark Doty’s The Art of Description: World into Word, and the most recent issue of Best American Poetry.  Students will write one poem per week towards a final portfolio of fourteen poems, the completion of which will count as the final exam.  Course requirements include discussion of the readings, group work, in-class writing, and take-home writing assignments.

Who Says? Points of View and Forms in Fiction * Writing Intensive *
Instructor: Wong
21:350:384                  Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

Every story and novel is written from a vantage point and the decisions about who should do the telling and from what distance is one of the most important an author makes. Who is telling the story? How close or distant are they from the action? What is the effect of their angle on the information imparted to the reader? This course presents a consideration of these questions by studying points of view and forms along a spectrum from the most interior to the most exterior. The central text will be Points of View: An Anthology of Short Stories. This book presents a theory of point of view that traces the possibilities from the most interior and subjective to the most exterior and subjective. Each week a different point of view will be discussed and students will employ it in writing a short story of their own. Work will be alternately workshopped, read aloud, or critiqued with partners or in small groups. Beyond the stories in the textbook, other novels and short stories will offer supplemental examples of the techniques. By the end of the course students will be familiar with all of the major points of view.

Writers at Newark I * Writing Intensive *
Instructor: Lima
21:352:207:Q1            T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

The objectives of this course, based each semester on the books of the writers featured in the Writers At Newark Reading Series, are to diversify our understanding of contemporary American writing in fiction and poetry, and to explore the development of personal identity in the books of prominent writers who work to sculpt individualized voices within a framework of multiplicitous American identities. Students have the unique opportunity to attend readings by the visiting writers at monthly readings and Q&As. Completion of this course requires attendance at all 4 (Tuesday, 5:30 p.m.) readings. See www.ncas.rutgers.edu/mfa for Writers At Newark schedule and writer bios.